Can Pete Buttigieg win the Democratic nomination? | The Tylt

Can Pete Buttigieg win the Democratic nomination?

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg's supporters say he's a strong and level-headed centrist—he doesn't have the baggage of other candidates like Joe Biden and he's not as radical as Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren. His critics say his policies would not go far enough to actually address the problems facing America. The fact that he's a favorite of wealthy Democratic donors shows he is part of the problem, not the solution. 

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Can Pete Buttigieg win the Democratic nomination?
#ButtigiegCanWin
A festive crown for the winner
#ButtigiegIsOver
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Can Pete Buttigieg win the Democratic nomination?
#ButtigiegCanWin
#ButtigiegIsOver
#ButtigiegCanWin

Pete Buttigieg was a nobody when he launched his campaign for president. Against all odds, he's broken into the top four Democratic presidential candidates. He's outraised most of his fellow candidates and has the most offices in early voting primary states. He's an unlikely candidate, but as we've seen in 2016, prior experience is no longer a requirement to be President, according to voters. 

Politico has a summary of his positions here. Take a look and judge for yourself. 

Mayor Pete is running on a platform of responsibility. To his supporters, he's a breath of fresh air after the chaos of Trump. Buttigieg is a kind of a whiz-kid. He went to Harvard, was a Rhodes scholar, served in the military, and became mayor of South Bend, Indiana at the age of 29. He's been able to launch his campaign from nothing to becoming a fundraising darling among the Democratic donor class.

#ButtigiegCanWin

Buttigieg's supporters say he's been facing an unfair amount of criticism—he's actually done incredibly well for himself despite his outsider status. Despite early skepticism, he's already beaten out senators, representatives, governors, and billionaires. 

#ButtigiegIsOver

Buttigieg's critics say he's clearly on the side of the wealthy and elite. Wall Street has embraced him for his policies—he doesn't want to impose a tax on the rich like Sanders and Warren. But being friends with Wall Street doesn't necessarily translate to a win in the 200. In fact, according to Politico, one of their polls showed 76% of Americans believed the rich should pay more in taxes. That could spell trouble for Mayor Pete. 

#ButtigiegIsOver

His critics also say he's been unable to attract minority voters. He's been especially criticized for his inability to connect with Black voters—a key constituency if hopes to win the nomination and ultimately the presidency. Democratic presidential candidate Julián Casto criticized Buttigieg for this in an interview with the New York Times:

“It is very risky to nominate a candidate that can’t attract black and Latino voters,” Mr. Castro said during an interview. “He’s going by the old playbook of following the focus groups, going by what political consultants tell you. If we’ve learned anything from Donald Trump, unfortunately in a bad way, it’s that focus grouping and poll testing ain’t the way that you’re going to win.”

For his critics, it boils down to this:

FINAL RESULTS
Politics
Can Pete Buttigieg win the Democratic nomination?
#ButtigiegCanWin
A festive crown for the winner
#ButtigiegIsOver