Do you trust the police? | The Tylt

Do you trust the police?

Police brutality has no place in society, yet it seems the country is faced with evidence to the contrary with each passing day. During the month of May alone, the public mourned the losses of Sean Reed, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd, who all died at the hands of police. Although investigations have been launched to address each of these tragedies, many say the evidence is clear: the police cannot be trusted. Still, not everyone is in agreement, and many believe that although the police force is far from perfect, the law-enforcement body on the whole should be trusted by the public. Do you feel you can trust the police?

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Evidence suggests trusting the police is a privilege. The victims of police brutality are most often people of color, particularly young Black men. According to The Los Angeles Times' Amina Khan: 

About 1 in 1,000 black men and boys in America can expect to die at the hands of police, according to a new analysis of deaths involving law enforcement officers. That makes them 2.5 times more likely than white men and boys to die during an encounter with cops.
The analysis also showed that Latino men and boys, black women and girls and Native American men, women and children are also killed by police at higher rates than their white peers. But the vulnerability of black males was particularly striking.

With this in mind, it's easy to see why trusting law enforcement is out of the question. As civil rights lawyer, S. Lee Merritt puts it:

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On May 25, George Floyd was killed as a result of police brutality. After arresting him, an officer knelt on Floyd's neck, making it impossible for him to breathe. The next day, the FBI launched an investigation into Floyd's death and four officers were fired from the Minneapolis Police Department. The New York Times' Christine Hauser reports:

As the video spread on social media on Monday night, the arrest quickly drew comparisons to the case of Eric Garner, an unarmed black man who died in New York Police custody in 2014, after an officer held him in a chokehold. Mr. Garner’s repeated plea of “I can’t breathe” — also recorded by a cellphone — became a rallying cry at demonstrations against police misconduct around the country.
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Nevertheless, according to Pew Research, Americans largely still trust law enforcement officials. Per The New York Times' Heather Murphy: 

Despite a vast number of incidences of police brutality and misconduct in recent years, the police closely followed principals in several trust categories. Seventy-nine percent of participants believed that police officers care about them all or most of the time, and nearly as many think that they provide fair and accurate information.

It's worth noting, however, that responses differed across racial and ethnic groups: 

Whereas more than 70 percent of white Americans said police officers treated racial and ethnic groups equally at least some of the time, just half of Hispanic Americans and only a third of black Americans said the same.
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Some believe that it is the job of the police force to work daily to regain and then keep the trust of the entire public. The Police Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping police be more effective in doing their job, features a blog post by Dr. David J. Thomas, the Police Foundation's senior research fellow. Thomas writes:

Our belief system as police has to change.
We work for the citizens in our communities, and we do not have the luxury of selective policing. Such thinking is destructive, and we are no more entitled to respect than the citizens that we serve. Our actions have cost us something far greater than the respect of the communities we serve; we have become indiscriminate prey for those who are looking for a reason to attack us.

According to Thomas, trust in law enforcement is possible, but the relationship between the police and the public must be rebuilt.

FINAL RESULTS
Culture
Do you trust the police?
#ITrustThePolice
A festive crown for the winner
#IDontTrustThePolice